Traditional Mulled Cider Recipe

A seasonal staple in the cider regions of England during the Holidays and Wassailing. Americans generally mull "cider" using fresh apple juice. We suggest you try it as they make it in the Old Country and us a dry to semi-dry fermented cider.

While making the following quantity is not inexpensive it does go quite a long ways at a party and the recipe can easily be divided into half.

Ingredients

  • 3½pts/2L dry or semi-dry cider
  • 2 apples studded with cloves
  • 4-6 cinnamon sticks
  • 5-6 allspice berries
  • zest of 1/2 to 1 orange (to taste, too much can over power your drink)
  • Apple Brandy, Calvados, or Apple Jack to taste/strength. We like to make our mulled cider using apple spirits but rum and whiskey will also work.
  • slices of apple for garnish

Preparation method
  • Combine all ingredients in a large saucepan and simmer gently for 30 minutes - do not boil.
  • Transfer to a heatproof bowl and ladle into glass mugs. Garnish with apple slices to serve.

San Juan Island 48

makes 1 highball | start to finish: 5 minutes

  • 2 ounces gin
  • 1 ounce fresh lemon juice
  • 1/2 ounce cider syrup
  • 5 ounces very dry cider
  • optional garnish: twist of lemon zest

Fill a highball glass two thirds of the way with ice. Pour in the gin, lemon juice and cider syrup on top of the ice. Cover the glass with a cocktail shaker and shake until the contents are well chilled. Top up the glass with cider, garnish with a lemon twist and serve.

Thimbleberry Splash

makes 1 highball | start to finish: 5 minutes

  • 1 ounce San Juan Island Distillers Gin
  • 1 ounce San Juan Distillers Thimbleberry Brandy
  • 6 ounces hard cider
  • optional garnish: fresh raspberry

Fill a highball glass two thirds of the way with ice. Pour in the gin and brandy on top of the ice. Cover the glass with a cocktail shaker and shake until the contents are well chilled. Top up the glass with cider, garnish with a fresh raspberry and serve.

Cider Syrup

Westcott Bay Orchards on San Juan Island.

Westcott Bay Orchards on San Juan Island.

This brilliant variation on bartender’s simple syrup adds a concentrated hit of sweet apple flavor to any cocktail.

makes about 2 1/2 cups syrup | start to finish: 10 minutes

  • 2 cups hard cider
  • 2 cups sugar

In a small saucepan over medium heat, bring the cider to a simmer. Add the sugar and stir until completely dissolved, possibly as long as 1 minute. Remove the pan from the heat, let cool to room temperature, and pour into a glass or plastic bottle. Store in the fridge for up to 1 month.

A is for Apple, B is for Bourbon

recipe courtesy Amy Grondin for Finnriver Farm & Cidery

Amy’s a hard-working fisherman, and this serious cocktail is an excellent finish to a day of physical labor. Buffalo Trace bourbon is particularly delicious with the apple wine, but any good bourbon will do nicely.

makes 1 cocktail | start to finish: 5 mintues

1 ounce Finnriver Spirited Apple Wine
1 ounce Bourbon
Orange twist for garnish

Combine ingredients in a cocktail shaker with ice. Cover and shake hard until well chilled. Strain into a cocktail glass. Garnish with an orange twist.

Spring Mimosa

Tart, intense pomegranate juice is nicely mellowed out by the cider. In comparison, the lemony garnish stands out as pleasantly sweet.

makes 1 cocktail | start to finish: 5 minutes

2 ounces chilled pomegranate4 ounces chilled méthode champenoise cideroptional garnish: sprig of lemon balm or lemon twist. Pour the pomegranate juice into a champagne flute. Top with cider, garnish with a sprig of lemon balm or twist of lemon zest and serve.


The best mimosas are made with ultra-fizzy methode champenoise ciders that tend towards the dry side. Look for Finnriver Artisan Sparkling Cider, Snowdrift Cider Co. Dry, or Perry, Eaglemount Homestead Dry or Perry, Westcott Bay Cider Dry or Very Dry, Tieton Cider Works Tieton Blend or Precipice Perry.


Submitted by Jill Lightner, Editor of Edible Seattle @edibleseattle

Submitted by Jill Lightner, Editor of Edible Seattle
@edibleseattle

Winter Mimosa

Blood oranges have a gorgeous ruby red color and tasty raspberry notes mixed in with their orange flavors. Their season typically begins in January and continues through March.

makes 1 cocktail | start to finish: 5 minutes

2 ounces chilled fresh blood orange juice
4 ounces chilled méthode champenoise cider
optional garnish: blood orange twist
Pour the blood orange juice into a champagne flute. Top with cider, garnish with a twist of blood orange zest and serve.


The best mimosas are made with ultra-fizzy methode champenoise ciders that tend towards the dry side. Look for Finnriver Artisan Sparkling Cider, Snowdrift Cider Co. Dry, or Perry, Eaglemount Homestead Dry or Perry, Westcott Bay Cider Dry or Very Dry, Tieton Cider Works Tieton Blend or Precipice Perry.

Submitted by Jill Lightner, Editor of Edible Seattle @edibleseattle

Submitted by Jill Lightner, Editor of Edible Seattle
@edibleseattle

Fall Mimosa

The passionfruit nectar gives this cocktail a gorgeous opaque orange glow, and just a hint of floral flavor to the drink. In a word: yum.

makes 1 cocktail | start to finish: 5 minutes

2 ounces chilled passionfruit nectar
4 ounces chilled méthode champenoise cider
optional garnish: orange twist

Pour the passionfruit nectar into a champagne flute. Top with cider, garnish with a twist of orange zest and serve.


The best mimosas are made with ultra-fizzy methode champenoise ciders that tend towards the dry side. Look for Finnriver Artisan Sparkling Cider, Snowdrift Cider Co. Dry, or Perry, Eaglemount Homestead Dry or Perry, Westcott Bay Cider Dry or Very Dry, Tieton Cider Works Tieton Blend or Precipice Perry.

Submitted by Jill Lightner, Editor of Edible Seattle

Submitted by Jill Lightner, Editor of Edible Seattle

Summer Mimosa

It’s time for a tropical beach party to meet up with a dressy brunch. Pineapple and apple play off each other nicely on the sweet-to-acidic scale, and gardeners will discover a favorite new use for the more unusual herb garnishes.

makes 1 cocktail | start to finish: 5 minutes

2 ounces chilled fresh pineapple juice
4 ounces chilled méthode champenoise cider
optional garnish: sprig of pineapple mint or pineapple sage
Pour the pineapple juice into a champagne flute. Top with cider, garnish with the sprig of pineapple mint or pineapple sage and serve.


The best mimosas are made with ultra-fizzy methode champenoise ciders that tend towards the dry side. Look for Finnriver Artisan Sparkling Cider, Snowdrift Cider Co. Dry, or Perry, Eaglemount Homestead Dry or Perry, Westcott Bay Cider Dry or Very Dry, Tieton Cider Works Tieton Blend or Precipice Perry.

Submitted by Jill Lightner, Editor of Edible Seattle @edibleseattle

Submitted by Jill Lightner, Editor of Edible Seattle
@edibleseattle

Cider Beer Cooler

recipe courtesy Neil Yamamoto for Finnriver Farm & Cidery

With the barest hint of black currant, this cooler mimics a shandy—but it’s just a touch fruitier than the classic combination of beer and hibiscus.

makes 1 highball | start to finish: 5 minutes

Combine cider and black currant brandy wine in a chilled pint glass. Top with the lager, pouring slowly to prevent foaming. Gently stir the ingredients together with a long-handled spoon; the color should be like a stout beer

Bitten Cherry

Tieton Cider Work’s cherry cider has remarkably complex cherry flavors, with hints of allspice and clove. It’s delicious with the depth and mineral qualities of a good stout.

makes 1 pint | start to finish: 5 minutes

Pour the cherry cider into a chilled pint glass. Top up the glass with stout, poured over the back of a spoon so it will layer nicely and not foam. Serve immediately.

Cider Nectar

The lemony tartness disguises all but the faintest kick of brandy in this refreshing highball. It’s perfect for a hot summer afternoon.

makes 1 highball | start to finish: 5 minutes

1 1/2 ounces brandy or cognac

1/4 ounce fresh lemon juice

1/4 teaspoon sugar
6 ounces cider

optional garnish: 2 lemon twists

Fill a highball glass two thirds of the way with ice. Add the brandy, lemon and sugar on top of the ice. Cover the glass with a cocktail shaker and shake until the contents are well chilled. Top up the glass with cider, garnish with two twists of lemon zest and serve.

Stone Fence

Stone Fence Drink Recipe.jpg

Adjust your bourbon as you like—Buffalo Trace’s vanilla sweetness is nice, Bulleit has just a hint of smokiness, and Woodford Reserve’s smoothness disappears with barely a whisper.

makes 1 highball | start to finish: 5 minutes

1 1/2 ounces bourbon
2 dashes bitters
6 ounces cider

Fill a highball glass two thirds of the way with ice. Pour in the bourbon and bitters on top of the ice. Cover the glass with a cocktail shaker and shake until the contents are well chilled. Top up the glass with cider, garnish with a lemon twist and serve.


A note on bitters
Angostura or Peychaud’s bitters are the ones you’ll be able to find most easily in grocery stores. With the bitters revival going on, we suggest tracking down terrific aromatic bitters from companies like Scrappy’s, Bittermens, Fee Brothers, Hella Bitter or The Bitter Truth.  They can be pricey, but since you’re using just a drop or two per cocktail, each bottle goes a long way. The flavors vary slightly from brand to brand—and even with that tiny amount in each drink, they can really improve the final cocktail. We figure if you’re starting with great cider, you’ll want to get all the details done right.